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Wednesday, September 13

  1. page microbit edited ... However, many of the initial activities are not really advanced and would make good micro:bit …
    ...
    However, many of the initial activities are not really advanced and would make good micro:bit activities for younger students.
    I've made some more notes about this course on the microbit Microsoft 14 week Intro to CS page.
    Looking through some of the initial activities, they do not appear to be very advanced at first, and could certainly be done by upper primary.
    For instance, lesson 1 involves creating a pet from craft supplies that can hold the microbit in place, typically as the face. The code blocks to show a face on the LEDs are provided.
    In lesson 2, "Algorithms", the main activity is showing a different "face" on the LEDs depending on whether button 1 or button 2 is pressed - again, the lesson instructions walk you through how to create the necessary blocks.

    (view changes)
    3:18 am
  2. page microbit Microsoft 14 week Intro to CS edited This curriculum is at https://makecode.microbit.org/courses/csintro. It is described as "targ…
    This curriculum is at https://makecode.microbit.org/courses/csintro. It is described as "targeted to middle school grades 6-8 (ages 11-14 years)".
    Looking more closely at the description, it seems to have quite a lot of content, as each of the 12 lessons consists of a 30 min unplugged activity, a 60 minute micro:bit activity, and 60-120 mins for an original project related to the concept. So it seems to me that you would want to be devoting two or three lessons per week to do it in one and a half terms.
    However, many of the initial activities are not really advanced and could make good micro:bit activities for younger students.
    Looking through some of the initial activities, they do not appear to be very advanced at first, and could certainly be done by upper primary. The first four lessons don't seem to require any special resources other than a microbit per pair of students, plus a computer for them to program the micro:bit. Other than that only standard craft supplies are used.
    Lesson 1 - Making
    For instance, lesson 1 "Making" involves creating a pet from craft supplies that can hold the microbit in place, typically as the face. The code blocks to show a face on the LEDs are provided.
    Lesson 2 - Algorithms
    In lesson 2, "Algorithms", the main activity is showing a different "face" on the LEDs depending on whether button 1 or button 2 is pressed - again, the lesson instructions walk you through how to create the necessary blocks. This lesson links well to the key concept of "branching" included in the Australian Year 3/4 Digital Technologies curriculum.(See https://goo.gl/NpGJy6)
    Lesson 3 - Variables
    The focus of this lesson is the use of variables. Choosing variable names is covered initially and the program created is used to count the score of students playing a game, such as Scissor Paper Rock. Example code is provided with full instructions. There are lots of fun extensions to this activity when you start looking at using sensors such as the accelerometer, e.g. count each time the micro:bit is shaken.
    Lesson 4 - Conditionals
    This takes the basic idea of Scissors Paper Rock and codes it up as a reasonably simple program that is activated when the micro:bit is shaken. However, the code is a reasonably big step up in complexity from previous lessons. The unplugged activity for this lesson is easily suitable for all ages and is meant to reinforce the concept of if...then statements.

    (view changes)
    3:05 am
  3. page microbit edited ... This curriculum is at https://makecode.microbit.org/courses/csintro. It is described as "…
    ...
    This curriculum is at https://makecode.microbit.org/courses/csintro. It is described as "targeted to middle school grades 6-8 (ages 11-14 years)".
    Looking more closely at the description, it seems to have quite a lot of content, as each of the 12 lessons consists of a 30 min unplugged activity, a 60 minute micro:bit activity, and 60-120 mins for an original project related to the concept. So it seems to me that you would want to be devoting two or three lessons per week to do it in one and a half terms.
    LookingHowever, many of the initial activities are not really advanced and would make good micro:bit activities for younger students.
    I've made some more notes about this course on the microbit Microsoft 14 week Intro to CS page.
    Looking
    through some
    ...
    upper primary.
    For instance, lesson 1 involves creating a pet from craft supplies that can hold the microbit in place, typically as the face. The code blocks to show a face on the LEDs are provided.
    In lesson 2, "Algorithms", the main activity is showing a different "face" on the LEDs depending on whether button 1 or button 2 is pressed - again, the lesson instructions walk you through how to create the necessary blocks.
    (view changes)
    2:43 am
  4. page microbit edited ... http://faraday.theiet.org/stem-activity-days/bbc-microbit/resources/index.cfm https://www.mic…
    ...
    http://faraday.theiet.org/stem-activity-days/bbc-microbit/resources/index.cfm
    https://www.microbit.co.uk/STEM
    Microsoft's 14 week "Intro to CS" Curriculum
    This curriculum is at https://makecode.microbit.org/courses/csintro. It is described as "targeted to middle school grades 6-8 (ages 11-14 years)".
    Looking more closely at the description, it seems to have quite a lot of content, as each of the 12 lessons consists of a 30 min unplugged activity, a 60 minute micro:bit activity, and 60-120 mins for an original project related to the concept. So it seems to me that you would want to be devoting two or three lessons per week to do it in one and a half terms.
    Looking through some of the initial activities, they do not appear to be very advanced at first, and could certainly be done by upper primary.
    For instance, lesson 1 involves creating a pet from craft supplies that can hold the microbit in place, typically as the face. The code blocks to show a face on the LEDs are provided.
    In lesson 2, "Algorithms", the main activity is showing a different "face" on the LEDs depending on whether button 1 or button 2 is pressed - again, the lesson instructions walk you through how to create the necessary blocks.

    (view changes)
    2:41 am

Thursday, September 7

  1. 11:31 pm

Wednesday, September 6

Friday, August 25

  1. user_add Erinbeth3 Erinbeth3 joined gdrive
    4:32 am

Sunday, August 13

  1. page microbit edited ... https://blog.groklearning.com/teaching-robotics-with-the-bbc-micro-bit-157867224b50 https://g…
    ...
    https://blog.groklearning.com/teaching-robotics-with-the-bbc-micro-bit-157867224b50
    https://groklearning.com/gym/microbit-playground/
    Science and the microbit
    Some lessons with the micro:bit that are related to Science (linked to US curriculum):
    http://microbit.org/en/2017-06-27-iste-lessons/
    http://faraday.theiet.org/stem-activity-days/bbc-microbit/resources/index.cfm
    https://www.microbit.co.uk/STEM

    (view changes)
    3:15 am
  2. page microbit edited ... Once you've bought one, the very best place to start is http://microbit.org. BBC has set up th…
    ...
    Once you've bought one, the very best place to start is http://microbit.org. BBC has set up the micro:bit foundation that runs this site, and it is full of introductory information and lesson resources.
    In addition to this site, and linking to some of the same information, is https://www.microbit.co.uk/home
    Basic Blockly lessons and activities
    If you want to start out with some simple fun activities using the Blockly style editor, then the codeclub activities at https://codeclubprojects.org/en-GB/microbit/ look like a good place to start.

    Python on the micro:bit
    The micro:bit can be programmed with blocks, which is a great way to get started, no pesky syntax errors. However, the Australian Digital Technologies curriculum says that all year 7 students should learn to use a general purpose programming language - Python is a great choice. Check out the Python on the micro:bit page.
    (view changes)
    3:03 am

Friday, August 11

  1. page microbit edited ... The micro:bit can be programmed with blocks, which is a great way to get started, no pesky syn…
    ...
    The micro:bit can be programmed with blocks, which is a great way to get started, no pesky syntax errors. However, the Australian Digital Technologies curriculum says that all year 7 students should learn to use a general purpose programming language - Python is a great choice. Check out the Python on the micro:bit page.
    Another interesting site is the Microbit playground at https://microbit-playground.co.uk/
    ...
    find! https://www.microbit.co.uk/td/lessons# Except on later reflection I realised these seem to be based on the "Touch Develop" IDE(?) developed by Microsoft Research, so I'm not sure whether that's necessarily the path you want to take - personally I'd rather use Blockly and then go straight to Python.
    Grok and the micro:bit
    After attending PyCon 2017, it is clear that Grok Learning people are keen on the micro:bit too, and they offer a number of interesting blog entries and lessons (paid content):
    https://groklearning.com/course/microbit-crash-course/ (Paid content, first two modules free, Grok is FREE to ALL year 5 and 7 students in Australia in 2017)
    https://blog.groklearning.com/teaching-robotics-with-the-bbc-micro-bit-157867224b50
    https://groklearning.com/gym/microbit-playground/

    (view changes)
    9:44 pm

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